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White Pearl Tickets

London Play
The Royal Court's White Pearl is the new debut play by New Yorker Anchuli Felicia King
“It’s just a fun ad. Now the whole world is going crazy.” In Singapore, Clearday™ has developed from a small start-up company to a leading international cosmetic brand in less than a year. But when a draft of the company’s latest skin cream advert is leaked, the video goes viral globally for all the wrong reasons. YouTube views are in the thousands and keep climbing; anger is building on social media; and journalists are starting to cover the story. This is an international PR nightmare; the company cannot be seen to be racist, they’ve got to get it taken down before America wakes up. “It’s on BUZZFEED. It’s on BUZZFEED. We’re not defending it.” White Pearl marks writer Anchuli Felicia King’s international playwriting debut. She is a New York-based, multidisciplinary artist of Thai-Australian descent. Director Nana Dakin has previously assisted on Mary Jane, (New York Theater Workshop, where she is a Directing Fellow), and Wild Goose Dreams, (Public, NYC).
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Rated 3.6 out of 5 (9 Reviews)
  • Review Avatar May 19, 2019

    A thought provoking work. Time flew!

  • Review Avatar May 24, 2019

    As a Director myself, I would not have staged this play in its present form. The premise is a good one, and it is full of good ideas, but the writing is essentially undramatic and is clearly the work if an inexperienced playwright. The script is in dire need of the attentions of a dramaturg. Plays need to show things, not talk about things. The direction could have been better. Too many scene changes! Also, the cast needed to be encouraged to engage with the audience. They were all bound up with themselves, usually acting behind a table or counter too, so that we could not see them clearly. I'm a little surprised that Royal Court staged such an undeveloped work.

  • Review Avatar May 24, 2019

    The diction in the first 15 minutes or so was poor or at least the people in my party said this afterwards and they are by no means all deaf. I thought the set was 5*, it really created the feeling of being in a ultra high-speed business world where your job and livelihood are on the line the whole time. The actor who stood out for me was the short, oriental woman who wore black and white and appeared to be, at least in the first half,the right hand woman to the absolutely gorgeous exec in the red hot outfit.

  • Review Avatar May 31, 2019

    very entertaining

  • Review Avatar May 31, 2019

    Underwhelmed. An old message served up in fancy dress. Clever staging but nothing original to say. Why is your theatre so cold?

  • Review Avatar May 31, 2019

    Interesting treatment of racism from Asians about Asians and black people.

  • Review Avatar Jun 1, 2019

    Very interesting play. the actresses and the lone actor played well and immersed themselves and us, in a subject which is very relevant in modern business life. Of course being French, I am not absolutely happy with the caricatural villain being French, but it is a refreshing change from the mustachioed western oriental Saddam look-alike, the guttural Russian, the heels-clicking German, not to mention the long-nosed Jew of yore. It is fascinating to see how thoroughly the former British colonies assimilated the very special view of the English on the French. The theater itself is comfortable and offer good views. Spectators are allowed to bring their glass in, but behave in a civilized fashion. I highly recommend both the play and the venue

  • Review Avatar Jun 7, 2019

    Insipid dialogue with an overuse of four-letter words. Portrays young Asian women as a bunch of overindulged spoiled brats. Definitely wouldn’t recommend to anyone over the age of 25. Older theatregoers beware.

  • Review Avatar Jun 16, 2019

    The attempt on addressing racism amongst Asians was rather weak. There’s so much to talk about historically for the tensions that exist. It felt very glossed over and slightly unfocused.